This is the website for the West Hartford Youth Soccer Association, a co-ed league. It is used for registration and payment, league and team management and communication.

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WEST HARTFORD YOUTH SOCCER ASSOCIATION


CODE OF CONDUCT


INTRODUCTION

The West Hartford Youth Soccer Association (“WHYSA”) is a non-profit organization that organizes soccer programs for children in West Hartford, Connecticut. WHYSA strives to provide an age appropriate soccer-playing environment for all children in the program that accommodates each child’s ability and desire to play at various levels of competition. Accordingly, WHYSA offers youth soccer programs in recreational, travel, and premier divisions. WHYSA emphasizes fun, fair play, skill development, teamwork, and sportsmanship. Our mission is to enhance all participants’ enjoyment of their soccer experience. To better achieve this goal; this document outlines the Code of Conduct (the “Code”) for all of the parents, coaches, officials and players associated with WHYSA. The Code is a written contract between the parents, coaches, players and, officials to abide by the Laws of the Game as well as maintain a cooperative attitude and to uphold the ideals of fair play and sportsmanship. It is important to remember that the “players” in WHYSA are CHILDREN. This contract is more than just paper; it is the essence of our goals and objectives and thus, adherence to it is of primary importance.
 

MAINTAINING A POSITIVE ATTITUDE
 
WHYSA expects parents, coaches, officials and players to demonstrate a positive and respectful attitude towards everyone involved in the sport.


SETTING A GOOD EXAMPLE
 
WHYSA expects each person associated with the program to be accountable for their own behavior at all times around the field of play. Each parent, coach, official, player, and spectator is responsible for setting a good example and should not tolerate those who do not. WHYSA will not tolerate conduct that is detrimental to the sport, the participant or the community. Such conduct includes, without limitation: VULGARITY or vulgar and/or inappropriate gestures by parents, coaches, officials or players; HARASSMENT or belittling of officials, coaches or players; VIOLENCE or the threat of violence toward anyone before, during or after a match; VERBAL ABUSE directed toward anyone before, during or after a match; and the TAUNTING of opposing parents, coaches, officials or players. WHYSA expects parents, coaches, officials, players, and other adults to exercise self-restraint.

 
A GOOD RELATIONSHIP

PLAYERS PLAY, COACHES COACH, REFEREES REF AND SPECTATORS WATCH.

OFFICIALS
On a soccer field, the referee is the symbol of authority and often the target of criticism. The referee’s job is a difficult one. All referees are human and they do make mistakes. WHYSA expects parents, coaches, players, and spectators to demonstrate a positive, respectful attitude toward all officials.
 
COACHES
The primary responsibility of the coach is to coach and teach children the game of soccer. Coaches are also responsible for the team’s supporters, but parents should not expect coaches to police the sidelines. Positive support for the team and coaches is both encouraged and expected.
 
OPPONENTS
Parents, coaches, players, are required to maintain a sense of fair play and be respectful of opposing players, coaches, and fans at all times.
 
PARENTS & SPECTATORS
Parents and spectators are vital to providing moral support and good sportsmanship values to players. WHYSA expects that they model good examples by politely encouraging and cheering the teams on while, at the same time, refraining from engaging in any language or conduct that could be considered abusive or detrimental to players, coaches, or officials.


VIOLATIONS OF THE CODE OF CONDUCT

Currently, the CJSA guidelines, in conjunction with WHYSA, set a minimum standard of discipline that is expected of parents, coaches, players, officials, and spectators. WHYSA, in an effort to be a leader in this very difficult area, may set its own, tougher standards with respect to several key situations (i.e., ejections for fighting, dissent and/or verbal abuse). It is up to ALL of us - parents, coaches, players, officials, and administrators - to ensure that violations of the Code and poor sportsmanship do not occur. Any questions or disputes concerning the violations of the Code may be brought before the WHYSA Board of Directors.